Women's Ordination:God's Gift for a Renewed Church

Rea Howarth, Coordinator of Catholics Speak Out (left), Dr. Ida Raming (middle), and Dr. Iris Mueller (right), two Catholic theologians and pioneers of women's ordination speak about their ordination, excommunication and women priests in the Roman Catholic Church in a program entitled "Women's Ordination: God's Gift for a Renewed Church" Dr. Ida Raming and Dr. Iris Mueller were two of the seven women ordained in the summer of 2002 on the Danube River

 

Video Clips from GODTALKTV show.
To order new videos on women priests, click here.

Video Clip 1 Rea Howarth, Coordinator of Catholics Speak Out, Dr. Ida Raming and Dr. Iris Mueller, two Catholic theologians and pioneers of women's ordination speak about their experience of ordination as a spiritual and political challenge. Raming's doctoral study (1969) argued that the church's exclusion of women from the priesthood was based upon the concept of the ethical inferiority of women. In her presentation, Ida reminded her audience that the canons of the church in Medieval times taught that baptism, not maleness, was the essential criterion for priestly ordination. In Christian baptism, there is neither male nor female, all are one in Christ.

Video Clip 2 Consecration of Mass: Women Priests: Dr. Iris Mueller, Dr. Ida Raming and Rev. Joan Hammond lead congregation in praying Words of Consecration at Eucharist in N. Va. in April 2003.




Video Clip 3 Dr. Iris Mueller calls on women to have burning hearts to stuggle against unjust discrimination in the church.





Video Clip 4 Dr Ida Raming recalls that St. Therese of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church, felt that she was called to priesthood. In Story of a Soul, Therese wrote: " I feel in me the vocation of the warrrior, the priest, the apostle."



Video Clip 5 In this clip, Dr. Ida Raming affirms that the ban on women's ordination in Roman Catholic church is based on discrimination against women. She asserts that in the Middle Ages canonists (official church teachers) taught that baptism, not male gender is the basis for ordination.